Novels and Literature Set in and Around New Haven, CT

    Temperatures are dropping which means that it’s that time of the year when you bundle up, dust off the fireplace and curl up with a really good book. Some people may know this already but New Haven, CT has served as inspiration for many works of both fiction and non-fiction literature over the years.

    Here’s a brief rundown of some works that have been set in and around the “Elm City”:

    1. Bushnell’s Submarine – Arthur S.  Lefkowitz

    The true story of  how American inventor and engineer, David Bushnell, built the first submarine in an attempt to sink British fleets and the HMS Eagle. According to a synopsis in the book:

    “This is both the story of how the world’s first submarine was built and how it was employed in the Continental Army’s desperate attempt to hold on to New York in 1776.

    2. Dark Eagle – John Ensor Harr

    Set during the American Revolution, this novel chronicles successes and infamous failures of Benedict Arnold. From an Amazon.com synopsis:

    “From the glory of Arnold’s early days on the battlefield, to the wrath he incurred as he attempted to deliver West Point and three thousand American troops into the hands of the British, Dark Eagle is the extraordinary story of one of the most complex, tragic heroes in history.”

    via abcnews.go.com
    via abcnews.go.com

    3. The Island of Lost Maps – Miles Harvey

    A non-fiction work, published in 2000, follows a national crime spree complete with mystery, intrigue and masterful storytelling. A brief synopsis:

    “The Island of Lost Maps is the story of a curious crime spree: the theft of scores of valuable centuries-old maps from some of the most prominent research libraries in the United States and Canada. The perpetrator was the Al Capone of cartography, a man with the unlikely name of Gilbert Bland, Jr., an enigmatic antiques dealer from south Florida whose cross-country slash-and-dash operation went virtually undetected until he was caught in December 1995. “

    4. The Little Women – Katharine Weber

    Described as a “delightfully clever contemporary novel inspired by the Louisa May Alcott classic”, The Little Women is an updated, autobiographical look at family life and what it truly means to be loyal.

    From a New York Times book review:

    “An ingenious combination of classic storytelling in a contemporary mode,The Little Women confirms Katharine Weber’s reputation as a writer who “astutely explores the gap between perception and reality.”

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